Skip to main content
Are you okay? Emergency/Crisis

Criminology and Justice

Degree Bachelor of Arts (Honours)
Faculty Faculty of Social Science and Humanities
Location UOIT, Downtown Oshawa
Start dates September
Length Four years
Program load Full-time
OUAC code DAJ
Photo for Criminology and Justice
Our program explores and critically analyzes criminological and sociological theories of why people commit crime. It also examines how societies define crime and who is considered a criminal. Our program approaches the study of crime from an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing on a rich tradition from criminology, sociology, philosophy, psychology and law. In addition to examining why crime is committed, you will be encouraged to think about crime, criminal justice and its administration in ways that are consistent with the principles of fairness, equity, peace and justice.

General information

Crime is not committed in a vacuum. It occurs in a particular socio-economic and political context. Criminology examines the broader social and individual contexts that lead to criminal behaviour. It also examines how criminal justice is shaped by larger social, political and technological contexts, and how those contexts are translated into practice in agencies such as the police, courts, corrections, the juvenile system and various social and government service agencies.

Our program explores and critically analyzes criminological and sociological theories of why people commit crime. It also examines how societies define crime and who is considered a criminal. Our program approaches the study of crime from an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing on a rich tradition from criminology, sociology, philosophy, psychology and law. In addition to examining why crime is committed, you will be encouraged to think about crime, criminal justice and its administration in ways that are consistent with the principles of fairness, equity, peace and justice.

You may pursue the comprehensive program or a specialization in:

  • Criminal Justice
  • Youth, Crime and Justice

Additional information

Criminology and Justice on the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities website

Admission requirements

Current Ontario secondary school students must complete the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with six 4U or 4M courses, including English (ENG4U).

Note: Admission is competitive. The specific average or standing required for admission varies from year to year. Students are selected by taking into consideration a wide range of criteria including school marks, distribution of subjects taken, and performance in subjects relevant to the academic program. Possession of the minimum requirements does not guarantee acceptance. Preference will be given to applicants with the best qualifications.


Last year's cut-off 70 per cent
Expected cut-off Low 70s

How to apply

The application process and important dates/deadlines are outlined on our admissions website:
Ontario secondary school applicants
Ontario secondary school graduates
Canadian out-of-province high school applicants
international applicants
mature applicants (over 21 and never attended post-secondary)
transfer applicants
General Arts and Science (GAS) applicants
home-schooled applicants

Program curriculum

Sample courses: 

  • The Canadian Legal System
  • Criminal Justice
  • Criminal Law
  • Deviance
  • Diversity and Justice
  • Hate Crime
  • Policing
  • Prosecution and Sentencing
  • Psychology
  • Social Control and Regulation
  • Social Policy
  • Theories of Crime
  • Victimology
  • Youth Crime

A full program map is available in the Undergraduate Academic CalendarCourses are subject to change without notice.

Experiential learning

A limited number of fourth-year students are granted an opportunity to participate in a learning experience with a community organization. The practicum is an experiential learning tool that provides students with opportunities to acquire workplace skills and knowledge, confront the relationship between theory and practice, and cultivate a sense of personal and professional development. The Practicum course consists of 100 hours of fieldwork, several in-class seminars and a set of academic assignments.

Career opportunities

Graduates will be skilled in taking leadership roles and more collaborative approaches within their own fields and within the related infrastructures of society.

You will be well prepared to pursue a variety of career opportunities including:

  • correctional office/case manager
  • government researcher and policy analyst
  • human rights advocate/community activist
  • police officer
  • probation/parole officer
  • social services worker
Ask a question Download viewbook
University of Ontario Institute of Technology logo